Our Laboratory studies the impact of macroeconomic policies implemented by monetary and fiscal authorities on economic growth. Such research involves the analysis of monetary authorities’ action, including those of central banks of different countries, taking into account national differences in terms of tools and methods of the monetary policy, their role as a governmental agent, the degree of independence from other public authorities, their role in the development and prevention of national and global financial crises.

The analysis is carried out taking into account the interaction of monetary authorities, credit and banking system and fiscal authorities in order to determine the best ways to stimulate economic growth. Findings of the research are highly important for the development of the theory in the field of macroeconomic finances, for the evaluation of the impact of macroeconomic policy on the economic dynamics of Russia, and also to justify the inevitable changes of the rules of the global monetary system, taking into account the present economic and political situation. This research is especially relevant for the development of the banking sector and economy of Russia.

The Laboratory works in collaboration with many Russian and foreign universities, including the Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia), the University of Maryland (College Park, USA), the Autonomous University of Madrid (Universidad Autonomade Madrid, Spain), The Complutense University of Madrid (Universidad Complutensede Madrid, Spain), the University of Cadiz (Universidadde Cadiz, Spain), Vienna University of Economics and Business (Wirtschafts Universitat Wien, Austria), the University of Florence (Italy), the Heilongjiang University (Harbin, China). Cooperation in research and development is also being developed with the Association of Russian Banks (Moscow, Russia) and the Siberian bank of "Sberbank Russia".

Expert in this field – Doctor of Economic Sciences, Professor Alexander Baranov, baranov@ieie.nsc.ru

Department of Economics NSU